EntreLeadership

EntreLeadership

20 Years of Practical Business Wisdom From the Trenches

Book - 2011
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From the New York Times bestselling author of The Total Money Makeover and radio and podcast host Dave Ramsey comes an informative guide based on how he grew a successful, multimillion dollar company from a card table in his living room.

Your company is only as strong as your leaders. These are the men and women doing battle daily beneath the banner that is your brand. Are they courageous or indecisive? Are they serving a motivated team or managing employees? Are they valued?

Your team will never grow beyond you, so here's another question to consider--are you growing? Whether you're sitting at the CEO's desk, the middle manager's cubicle, or a card table in your living-room-based start-up, EntreLeadership provides the practical, step-by-step guidance to grow your business where you want it to go. Dave Ramsey opens up his championship playbook for business to show you how to:

-Inspire your team to take ownership and love what they do
-Unify your team and get rid of all gossip
-Handle money to set your business up for success
-Reach every goal you set
-And much, much more!

EntreLeadership is a one-stop guide filled with accessible advice for businesses and leaders to ensure success even through the toughest of times.
Publisher: New York : Howard Books, c2011.
ISBN: 9781451617856
Characteristics: xii, 305 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.

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dgiard
May 10, 2020

Dave Ramsey has built a company that provides financial advice via seminars, a radio broadcast, a podcast, and numerous books.

His 2011 book "Entreleadership" is not about personal finance; but about what it takes to build and run a company. Ramsey coined the title word, combining "entrepreneur" and "leader" because he believes that one must embrace both roles in order to successfully build a small company.

He supports most of his advice with anecdotes from his own successes and failures as he grew his company.

The message running through this book is that a company is a team. As such, employees should be treated as team members; and the boss should think of himself as a leader; and you should hire candidates with a passion for what you are building, rather than those just looking for a job.

He talks about setting priorities: identify and perform the tasks that are important and urgent before turning to those that are important/not urgent or urgent/not important. Skip those that are neither important nor urgent.

He talks about the importance of a leader's ability to make a decision.

He talks about the importance of trust: "People will not buy from you if they don’t trust you, your product, and your company."

He talks about communication: it is important for a leader to share their goals with their team members, so they can make intelligent decisions.

He talks about debt, which he advises against - a philosophy I apply to my personal finances.

Much of Ramsey's thinking is based on his relationship with God. As a practicing Evangelical Christian, he looks to the Bible to lead him in his daily activities, including his business activities.

I was unfamiliar with Ramsey before reading this book.

I don't think I could work for him, primarily because he requires everyone in the company to spend their day at their desk in the office - a lifestyle I rejected years ago; and also because the following passage gave me pause: "privacy isn't a big deal to people who are living a clean life and doing the right thing."

But the book contains a lot of practical, common-sense advice, delivered in a straightforward manner.

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